A Million Dreams

“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them. If you can visualize it, if you can dream it, there’s some way to do it.” Walt Disney

You can Dream Big with us by helping to restore a Maui treasure – bringing it to life for the entire community to enjoy and making it a place where young children will connect in ways to help them fulfill their full potential.

We are ready. We have the vision, the plans, and much our funding in hand, but we need your support to build the dream that will give our youngest, most precious citizens the jump-start they need to succeed.

A gift of any amount is deeply appreciated. Gifts above $5,000 will be recognized in a permanent way through signage to be prominently displayed at the new Will Smith, Imua Family Discovery Garden.

Your gift will go toward purchase, restoration, renovation, and revitalizing construction as well as toward needed fixtures, furnishings, and equipment. Plus, we will set aside 10% for a maintenance endowment to help maintain and sustain our new facilities. 

Your generous gift to help build the Imua Family Discovery Garden is an investment that will yield benefits for generations. Thank you for making dreams come true.

    • Day Dreamer: $100-$499
      Receive a special A Million Dreams thank you card and an invitation to join us for our opening events.
    • Dream Catcher: $500-$999
      Receive everything in the previous tier, plus an exclusive “A Million Dreams” logo tee and a space upon our recognition plaque to honor a child of your naming.
    • Dream Weaver: $1000-$9,999
      Receive everything in the previous tiers, plus a special A Million Dreams VIP entry package at our next Color Festival Hawaii!
    • Dream Maker: $10,000+ 
      There are numerous wonderful opportunities to support Imua Discovery Garden through Naming and Giving Opportunities that will create a legacy for your generous philanthropy. For an invitation to preview our giving opportunities at levels of $10,000 and above, please reach out to us at discovery@imuafamily.org or call us at (808) 244-7467. Our team will work with you to arrange an appointment.

Preserving Maui’s Past – Inspiring its Future

There are a wonderful number of opportunities to support Imua Discovery Garden through Naming and Giving Opportunities that will create a legacy for your giving.

For an invitation to preview our giving opportunities at levels of $10,000 and above, please reach out to us at discovery@imuafamily.org or call us at (808) 244-7467. An Imua Family Services representative will reach out to you for an appointment.

The Imua Discovery Garden has beautiful grounds featuring traditional architecture designed by Charles William Dickey, one of Hawaii’s premier architects of the 20th-century, making for an incredible experience while on the property.

Charles William Dickey

Charles William “C.W.” Dickey (July 6, 1871 – April 25, 1942) was an American architect famous for developing a distinctive style of Hawaiian architecture. He was known not only for designing some of the most famous buildings in Hawaiʻi—such as the Alexander & Baldwin BuildingHalekulani HotelKamehameha Schools campus buildings – but also for influencing a cadre of notable successors. Though born in Alameda, California, he grew up in Haʻikū on Maui, returning to California for schooling. After finishing high school in Oakland, California, he obtained a B.A. in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1894, then worked with Clinton Briggs Ripley (1896–1900) and E.A.P. Newcomb (1901–1905) in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, before returning to open his own firm in Oakland. His initial designs in Hawaiʻi were eclectic. Influences of the then-popular Richardsonian Romanesque style can be seen in Punahou School’s Pauahi Hall (1894–96), the Bishop Estate Building on Merchant Street (1896), the Irwin Block (Nippu Jiji building) on Nuuanu Street (1896),  and Progress Block on Fort Street (1897) in Downtown Honolulu, the last now occupied by Hawaiʻi Pacific University. One of his finest early designs was the Italianate Stangenwald Building (1901) on Merchant Street. Many of these are contributing properties to the Merchant Street Historic District.